Psychology Transfer Major - AA

Curriculum Sequence

Fall Semester I Course Title Credit
SDV-108 THE COLLEGE EXPERIENCE 1
PSY-111 INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY 3
PHI-101 INTRODUCTION TO PHILOSOPHY 3
ENG-105 COMPOSITION I 3
BIO-105 INTRODUCTORY BIOLOGY 4
PSY-102 HUMAN AND WORK RELATIONS 3
TOTAL 17
Spring Semester II Course Title Credit
PSY-121 DEVELOPMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY 3
ENG-106 COMPOSITION II 3
MAT-156 STATISTICS 3
PSY-241 ABNORMAL PSYCHOLOGY 3
PSY-251 SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY 3
TOTAL 15
Fall Semester II Course Title Credit
ART-101 ART APPRECIATION 3
SOC-160 INTRODUCTION TO SOCIAL WORK 3
ENV-111 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE 4
PSY-228 DEATH AND DYING 3
SPC-112 PUBLIC SPEAKING 3
TOTAL 16
Spring Semester II Course Title Credit
PHI-105 INTRODUCTION TO ETHICS 3
SOC-212 DIVERSITY 3
HUM-287 LEADERSHIP DEVELOPMENT STUDIES 3
HIS-211 MODERN ASIAN HISTORY 3
TOTAL 12

SDV-108 - THE COLLEGE EXPERIENCE

Lecture: 1

Credit: 1

This course is designed to empower new students to successfully transition to college. Students will learn academic success skills, strategies for personal development and exploration, college culture and expectations, and how to access college resources and services.

PSY-111 - INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY

Lecture: 3

Credit: 3

A basic course in the understanding of behavior, designed to give the student a scientific background in the fundamental problems and techniques covered in the field of psychology.

PHI-101 - INTRODUCTION TO PHILOSOPHY

Lecture: 3

Credit: 3

A topical introduction to the major areas of philosophical inquiry.

ENG-105 - COMPOSITION I

Lecture: 3

Credit: 3

A study of the principles of writing. Emphasis on rhetoric, mechanics, and development of expository patterns: narration, description illustration, comparison/contrast, classification, process, and cause/effect. Required for AA and AS Degrees. Prerequisites: Meet minimum placement test score requirement.

BIO-105 - INTRODUCTORY BIOLOGY

Lecture: 3

Lab: 2

Credit: 4

Introductory Biology is a lecture and lab course designed for non-science majors or as a refresher course of those wishing to take higher-level biology courses. Topics include chemistry of life, molecular and cellular biology, genetics, evolution, plant, animal, and fungi classification, and ecology.

PSY-102 - HUMAN AND WORK RELATIONS

Lecture: 3

Credit: 3

This is a course that includes the understanding of the applications of psychological principles, theory, and research related to the work setting.

PSY-121 - DEVELOPMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY

Lecture: 3

Credit: 3

A systematic study of life-span development. Individual differences in behavior as well as cultural norms are considered in relation to heredity and environment.

ENG-106 - COMPOSITION II

Lecture: 3

Credit: 3

A continuation of study of the principles of writing begun in ENG-105. Emphasis is placed on persuasive writing, critical analysis, and the MLA research paper. Time will also be spent exploring print and electronic research sources and learning effective research strategies. Required for AA and AS Degrees. Prerequisite: ENG-105 with a grade of C- or better.

MAT-156 - STATISTICS

Lecture: 3

Credit: 3

This course is an applied course in statistics, designed to introduce students to some of the concepts, symbols, procedures, and vocabulary used in the field of statistics. Topics covered in this course include: organizing and graphing data, descriptive statistics, probability, various distributions, the sampling distribution of the mean, estimating a population mean, confidence intervals, inferential statistics (hypothesis testing), comparing two population parameters, analysis of variance, correlation, simple linear and multiple regression, contingency tables, and nonparametric statistics, (time permitting). Prerequisites: MAT-092 or MAT-099 with a minimum grade of C- or meets minimum placement testing requirements.

PSY-241 - ABNORMAL PSYCHOLOGY

Lecture: 3

Credit: 3

A survey of the history of mental illness including a study of normal and abnormal behavior as related to various cultures. Personality development, individual adjustment, and description of the various clinical entities and their relevance to present day life will be covered. Character disorders and personality structures which cause maladjustment are reviewed. A review of the theories of personality is included. Prerequisite: PSY-111.

PSY-251 - SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY

Lecture: 3

Credit: 3

The study of interpersonal relations, social attitudes, group dynamics, intergroup relations, class and cultural influence in a psychological context. Prerequisite: PSY-111.

ART-101 - ART APPRECIATION

Lecture: 3

Credit: 3

This course is a study of aesthetics as related to human expression, especially within the visual arts of painting, sculpture and architecture. This is a humanities-oriented course where art principles are examined as they relate to the production and interpretation of Western art in both historical and cultural contexts covering the Renaissance through post-modern periods.  Students will form personal opinions about art by looking at art and evaluating art with methods taught in class.

SOC-160 - INTRODUCTION TO SOCIAL WORK

Lecture: 3

Credit: 3

The introductory course in social welfare systems and social work practice surveys the historical development of the social work profession in conjunction with the development of social welfare services in the United States, social welfare system responses to a variety of current social problems; generalist social work as a distinct profession; and specific settings and methods of social work practice.

ENV-111 - ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE

Lecture: 3

Lab: 2

Credit: 4

An interdisciplinary approach to the problems of the environment. An examination and evaluation will be made of man’s impact on the environment. Specific topics that may be covered include, but are not limited to: population issues, atmospheric issues, water issues, energy issues, resource issues, wildlife issues, and food issues. 

PSY-228 - DEATH AND DYING

Lecture: 3

Credit: 3

This course will introduce students to the study of death and dying and the cultural, social, biological, and psychological aspects of death and dying. Topics to be covered include the reality and definition of death, the grief process, care of the dying, cultural customs related to death and dying, views and attitudes toward death and dying, and the scientific, legal, and ethical issues surrounding death and dying. Exploration of one's own views and attitudes concerning death and dying will be encouraged. In addition, opportunities to visit death-related industries such as funeral homes and cemeteries and to interact with professionals in the field such as hospice workers, grief counselors, and funeral directors will be provided.

SPC-112 - PUBLIC SPEAKING

Lecture: 3

Credit: 3

This course examines both the theoretical and practical basis of speech communication, particularly public speaking. Emphasis is on speech preparation, organization, support, delivery, and audience analysis.

PHI-105 - INTRODUCTION TO ETHICS

Lecture: 3

Credit: 3

A survey of the major ethical emphases from ancient to modem times with pertinent reading in the works of representative philosophers.

SOC-212 - DIVERSITY

Lecture: 3

Credit: 3

This course studies gender, race, class, sexuality and other issues of diversity. The curriculum highlights the duality of oppression and privilege and the ways in which race, gender, class and sexuality shape daily life. Special focus is on learning how to demonstrate course concepts as social action. Social justice is practiced as students become educated in these concepts of diversity and engage in diversity conscious social action.

HUM-287 - LEADERSHIP DEVELOPMENT STUDIES

Lecture: 3

Credit: 3

This course is designed to provide emerging and existing leaders the opportunity to explore the concept of leadership and to develop and improve their leadership skills. The course integrates readings from the humanities, experiential exercises, films/videos and contemporary readings on leadership.

HIS-211 - MODERN ASIAN HISTORY

Lecture: 3

Credit: 3

An introduction to the three dominant societies of modern Asia: China, Japan and India. Emphasis will be given to the transformation of cultural, economic, intellectual and social patterns brought about by the military power and economic demands of contemporary Western societies.

Polly Falcon - Professor, (319) 524-3221 ext. 1944

Email: pfalcon@scciowa.edu
BS, Texas A&M University
MS, University of North Texas

Lori Henderson - Professor, (319) 208-5000 ext. 5227

Email: lhenderson@scciowa.edu
BS, Western Illinois University
MS, Western Illinois University
PhD, Southern Illinois University-Carbondale

Lee Skeens - Professor, (319) 208-5000 ext. 5233

Email: lskeens@scciowa.edu
AS, Community College of the Air Force
BA, Southwest Texas State University
MA, Webster University
PhD, Capella University

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